ConventionSouth

SEP 2018

ConventionSouth magazine is the leading resource for meeting planners who book all types of events, conventions, conferences and group travel in the south.

Issue link: https://conventionsouth.epubxp.com/i/1028537

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 49 of 67

²ConventionSouth ² S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 8 w w w . c o n v e n t i o n s o u t h . c o m 50 T E N N E S S E E city's largest meeting and event facility. The certified Tennessee Green Hospitality center is one block off the parkway in the center of the city, with easy access to entertainment, shopping and dining. Opened last summer, the Margaritaville Island Hotel, located at The Island entertainment complex, offers a tropical vibe in a mountain at- mosphere, with 104 guest rooms and indoor and outdoor event space for up to 250 people. Dollywood's DreamMore Resort and Spa has 300 guest rooms and 6,000 square feet of indoor event space, plus additional outdoor venues. Other hotels with meeting space include the Ramsey Hotel and Convention Center, with 165 guest rooms and meeting space for up to 1,000 guests; Riverstone Resort & Spa, with 130 con- dominiums and event space for up to 350 people; Smoky Shadows Motel & Tower Conference Center, with 272 guest rooms and meeting space for up to 700 people; and Smoky Mountain Resorts Group, with more than 800 guest rooms ranging from hotels to condos and more than 20,000 square feet of meeting spaces in five loca- tions. The 160-room Spirit of the Smokies Condo Lodge has 9,000 square feet of function space and can seat up to 400 people for theater-style presentations. (See Breakout Spotlight on page 54 for more information.) Sevierville Offering championship golf, river and lake fishing, outlet shopping, music and other enter- tainment, Minor League baseball and more than 3,000 lodging options ranging from mountain cabins to luxury hotels, Sevierville is an attractive destination for events of all kinds, said Amanda Marr, director of marketing and communica- tions for the Sevierville Chamber of Commerce. She noted new attractions and developments throughout the town. "There are new boutiques and galleries, including Charlotte's Bruce Street Creative, a studio and gallery offering classes and consigned art, as well as the Arts in Common Gallery, featuring a collection of fine artists' works for sale," she said. "Both are in downtown Sevierville and both are willing to accommodate special programs (such as music, art classes, etc.) for groups." Tennessee Mountain Paintball offers a unique team-building opportunity with either low-impact or regular paintball. Zip lines and rope courses (there are 14 in the area) are other options for group events. The Lodge at Five Oaks reopened last fall after renovations, according to Marr: "It is an elegant farm-inspired hotel featuring hardwood flooring in every room and luxurious linens. The thing that's cool is it is located on the old Ogle Farm and the history of the property is told through images, old letters and memorabilia from the family." Located nearby, Oak Tree Lodge and Five Oaks Convention Center offers 100 guest rooms and meeting space for up to 200. Wilderness at the Smokies is a waterpark resort with 700 guest rooms and 10,000 square feet of function space. It is connected to the Sevierville Convention Center, with 240,000 square feet of ballrooms and meeting space. Holiday Inn Express and Suites has 107 guest rooms and meeting spaces for up to 110 people. The River Plantation Conference Center can seat up to 750 for theater-style presentations or seat up to 450 for dinners. (See Breakout Spotlight on page 56 for more information.) Smoky Mountains Away from the hustle and bustle of the busier tourist areas, the towns of Townsend, Alcoa, Maryville and Walland offer visitors the best of small-town hospitality while also providing convenient access to Knoxville's McGhee Tyson Airport, which is located in Alcoa. Townsend is also one of the three main entrances to Great Smoky Mountains National Park and allows visi- tors an easy drive to the popular Cades Cove area. Maryville, home to the corporate headquar- ters of the Ruby Tuesday restaurant chain, was awarded "Main Street" accreditation from the State of Tennessee and it continues to work on downtown redevelopment projects, said Kim Mitchell, director of tourism for the Blount Partnership. "Downtown is frequently alive with fun activities and entertainment," she said. ► Gatlinburg continues to add new attrac- tions, restaurants, and lodging options that appeal to groups of all types and sizes, said Dave Esslinger, director of sales, Gatlin- burg Convention and Visitors Bureau. "We're excited to announce that Blake Shelton's lifestyle-branded restaurant Ole Red is planned to open in March 2019 on the Parkway. Ole Red Gatlinburg will be a $9 million, multi-level, 16,000-square-foot entertainment venue with a two-story bar and restaurant, exterior terrace, perfor- mance space, dance floor and retail area." Two new resorts are just a short walk from the Gatlinburg convention center, Esslinger said. Margaritaville Resort Gatlinburg, which opened this past July with 162 sleeping rooms and 5,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor event space, and Cherokee Orchard Cabins. "The cabins are a great new option for group retreats," he said. "There are four different cabin styles that can accommodate between 46 and 82 people." Esslinger also noted the new Cliff Top Grill and Bar at Anakeesta, a 70-acre mountaintop entertainment and dining facility accessed from the downtown Park- way by chairlifts or enclosed gondolas. En- tertainment and team-building opportuni- ties at Anakeesta include dueling ziplines, Rail Runner Mountain Coaster, Treehouse Village and a botanical garden. In addition, Ober Gatlinburg has added to its array of activities suitable for team building, according to the CVB, with Ice Bumper Cars and a Rock Wall for climb- ing. Ober Gatlinburg can accommodate up to 250 people for seated dinners. Q B R E A K O U T S P O T L I G H T : Gatlinburg Ole Red Gatlinburg Contact: ŵĞĞƟŶŐƐŐĂƚůŝŶďƵƌŐĐŽŵ ŽƵƌƚĞƐLJ'ĂƚůŝŶďƵƌŐs

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of ConventionSouth - SEP 2018